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US Expat Taxes and Foreign Property

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US Expat Taxes and Foreign Property

Investing in foreign property as a US expat offers exciting opportunities for diversification and potential financial growth. However, navigating the complex landscape of international real estate transactions and understanding the associated tax implications is crucial. In this comprehensive guide, we’ll explore the key considerations for US expats when buying foreign property.

Do US residents have to pay taxes on foreign properties?

US residents are generally required to report and pay taxes on foreign property, including real estate, that they own or have an interest in. The IRS taxes US residents on their worldwide income, which includes income from foreign sources such as rental income, capital gains from the sale of foreign property, and other forms of income generated from foreign assets.

Tax implications of buying and selling property abroad

Income Tax on Rental Income: If you plan to rent out the property, you’ll likely need to pay income tax on the rental income generated from the property. Different countries have different rules and rates for taxing rental income. You may also be eligible for deductions or allowances related to rental expenses, as well as foreign tax credit to offset your US taxes.

Capital Gains Tax: When you sell the property, you may be subject to capital gains tax on any profit you make from the sale. Some countries have exemptions or reduced rates for capital gains tax on properties that are used as a primary residence for a certain period, whereas in the US, the capital gains are usually reported to the IRS. You can subsequently claim a credit on your US returns for foreign tax paid.

Property Transfer Tax: Some countries impose property transfer taxes or stamp duties when you purchase a property. These taxes are usually based on the property’s value and vary by jurisdiction.

Wealth Tax: Certain countries levy a wealth tax on the value of your assets, including real estate. This tax may be imposed annually or periodically.

Inheritance and Gift Tax: Consider the inheritance and gift tax rules of the country where the property is located. These rules determine how the property will be treated in your estate and how it can be passed on to heirs.

Local Taxes: Apart from national taxes, there may be local property taxes, municipal taxes, and other local charges associated with owning property.

Tax Treaties: Some countries have tax treaties with your home country that can affect the taxation of income and gains from foreign property. These treaties may provide relief from double taxation and impact the withholding tax rates.

Reporting Requirements: Many countries have reporting requirements for foreign property ownership, especially if you are renting it out or generating income. Failing to report accurately can lead to penalties.

Foreign Bank Account Reporting (FBAR) and FATCA: If you have financial accounts associated with the property, you may have reporting requirements under FBAR and FATCA to disclose those accounts to your home country’s tax authorities.

Currency Exchange: Fluctuations in exchange rates can impact the cost of buying, maintaining and selling the property and can also affect your tax calculations.

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Whether you’re a seasoned expat with a diverse portfolio of global assets or a first-time property buyer abroad, our tailored services are designed to meet your unique needs. Reach out to us today to learn more about how our expertise in US Expat Taxes and Foreign Property can work to your advantage.

 

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